Terrifying natural disasters captured on video

These are some of the most terrifying natural disasters to have ever been caught on video!

When the destructive forces of nature are unleashed, the results can be horrifying.

Sometimes, the world turns violent and unstable, with huge loss of life and massive devastation. Although rare to be captured on video, some videographers have managed to record some hair-raising videos of natural disasters. Here a small list:

The Great Hanshin earthquake in Japan on January 7, 1995

 

The eruption of Eyjafjallajökull in Iceland during May 2010

A flood in Toowoomba, Queensland in January 2011

A 2011 Japanese tsunami footage from Iwata Prefecture

A massive dust storm in Phoenix, Arizona in July 2011

A red dust storm caused by a cyclone in Australia in January 2013

A supercell north of Booker, Texas in June 2013

The Rim Fire in Yosemite National Park, California in August 2013

The eruption of Mount Kliuchevskoi, Russia in October 2013

A supercell between Wright and Newcastle, Wyoming in May 2014

Rotating thunderstorms near the town of Atlanta, Kansas in May 2014

A supercell in Nebraska in May 2014

Terrorism

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We live in very uncertain times.

Will You Be Prepared?

Click Here To Get this Top-Rated E-book and more!survive anything

We live in very uncertain times.

Not only are we facing climate, environmental, and economic disasters on a global level, but individually, thousands of us experience our own forms of disaster every day.

Fires, floods, tornadoes, hurricanes, earthquakes and accidents remind us just how vulnerable we really are. What would you do if basic services–water, gas, electricity or telephones–were cut off? Local officials and relief workers will be on the scene after a disaster, but they cannot reach everyone right away.

>  Are you prepared to administer first aid?

> Do you have sufficient food, water and clothing to survive for several days or several weeks if necessary?

> What is your Disaster Preparedness Plan? Do you even have one?

Answers to these questions and much more are outlined for you in precise detail in the Survive Anything Kit. Don’t wait until it’s too late after a disaster strikes. Disaster Issues.

Flood Preparedness

05

Here’s what you can do to prepare for such an emergency.

Know What to Expect

Know your area’s flood risk–if unsure, call your local Red Cross chapter, emergency management office, or planning and zoning department. If it has been raining hard for several hours, or steadily raining for several days, be alert to the possibility of a flood.
Listen to local radio or TV stations for flood information.

Reduce Potential Flood Damage By–

  •     Raising your furnace, water heater, and electric panel if they are in areas of your home that may be flooded.
  •     Consult with a professional for further information if this and other damage reduction measures can be taken.

Floods Can Take Several Hours or Days to Develop

  •     A flood WATCH means a flood is possible in your area.
  •     A flood WARNING means flooding is already occurring or will occur soon in your area.
  •      Flash Floods Can Take Only a Few Minutes to a Few Hours to Develop
  •     A flash flood WATCH means flash flooding is possible in your area.
  •     A flash flood WARNING means a flash flood is occurring or will occur very soon.

Prepare a Family Disaster Plan

  •     Check to see if you have insurance that covers flooding. If not, find out how to get flood insurance.
  •     Keep insurance policies, documents, and other valuables in a safe-deposit box.

Assemble a Disaster Supplies Kit Containing–First aid kit and essential medications.

  •     Canned food and can opener
  •     At least three gallons of water per person
  •     Protective clothing, rainwear, and bedding or sleeping bags
  •     Battery-powered radio, flashlight, and extra batteries.
  •     Special items for infants, elderly, or disabled family members.
  •     Written instructions for how to turn off electricity, gas and water if authorities advise you to do so. (Remember, you’ll need a professional to turn them back on.)
  •    Identify where you could go if told to evacuate. Choose several places . . . a friend’s home in another town, a motel, or a shelter.

When A Flood WATCH Is Issued

  •   Move your furniture and valuables to higher floors of your home.
  • Fill your car’s gas tank, in case an evacuation notice is issued.
  •     Be alert to signs of flash flooding and be ready to evacuate on a moment’s notice.

When A Flood WARNING Is Issued .

  •     Listen to local radio and TV stations for information and advice. If told to evacuate, do so as soon as possible.
  • Or if you think it has already started, evacuate immediately. You may have only seconds to escape. Act quickly!
  • Move to higher ground away from rivers, streams, creeks, and storm drains. Do not drive around barricades . . . they are there for your safety.
  • If your car stalls in rapidly rising waters, abandon it immediately and climb to higher ground.

Earthquake Preparedness

Here’s what you can do to prepare for such an emergency.earthquake

Prepare a Home Earthquake Plan

Choose a safe place in every room–under a sturdy table or desk or against an inside wall where nothing can fall on you.
Practice DROP, COVER, AND HOLD ON at least twice a year. Drop under a sturdy desk or table, hold on, and protect your eyes by pressing your face against your arm. If there’s no table or desk nearby, sit on the floor against an interior wall away from windows, bookcases, or tall furniture that could fall on you. Teach children to DROP, COVER, AND HOLD ON!
Choose an out-of-town family contact.
Consult a professional to find out additional ways you can protect your home, such as bolting the house to its foundation and other structural mitigation techniques.
Take a first aid class from your local Red Cross chapter. Keep your training current.
Get training in how to use a fire extinguisher from your local fire department.
Inform baby sitters and care givers of your plan.

Eliminate Hazards, Including–

Bolting bookcases, china cabinets, and other tall furniture to wall studs.
Installing strong latches on cupboards.
Strapping the water heater to wall studs.

Prepare a Disaster Supplies Kit For Home and Car, Including–

First aid kit and essential medications.
Canned food and can opener.
At least three gallons of water per person.
Protective clothing, rainwear, and bedding or sleeping bags.
Battery-powered radio, flashlight, and extra batteries.
Special items for infant, elderly, or disabled family members.
Written instructions for how to turn off gas, electricity, and water if authorities advise you to do so. (Remember, you’ll need a professional to turn natural gas service back on.)
Keeping essentials, such as a flashlight and sturdy shoes, by your bedside.

Know What to Do When the Shaking Begins

  • DROP, COVER, AND HOLD ON! Move only a few steps to a nearby safe place. Stay indoors until the shaking stops and you’re sure it’s safe to exit. Stay away from windows. In a high-rise building, expect the fire alarms and sprinklers to go off during a quake.
  • If you are in bed, hold on and stay there, protecting your head with a pillow.
  • If you are outdoors, find a clear spot away from buildings, trees, and power lines. Drop to the ground.
  • If you are in a car, slow down and drive to a clear place (as described above). Stay in the car until the shaking stops.

Identify What to Do After the Shaking Stops

  • Check yourself for injuries. Protect yourself from further danger by putting on long pants, a long-sleeved shirt, sturdy shoes, and work gloves.
  • Check others for injuries. Give first aid for serious injuries.
    Look for and extinguish small fires. Eliminate fire hazards. Turn off the gas if you smell gas or think it’s leaking. (Remember, only a professional should turn it back on.)
  • Listen to the radio for instructions.
  • Expect after shocks. Each time you feel one, DROP, COVER, AND HOLD ON!
  • Inspect your home for damage. Get everyone out if your home is unsafe.
    Use the telephone only to report life-threatening emergencies.

We live in very uncertain times.

Will You Be Prepared?

Click Here To Get this Top-Rated E-book and more!survive anything

We live in very uncertain times.

Not only are we facing climate, environmental, and economic disasters on a global level, but individually, thousands of us experience our own forms of disaster every day.

Fires, floods, tornadoes, hurricanes, earthquakes and accidents remind us just how vulnerable we really are. What would you do if basic services–water, gas, electricity or telephones–were cut off? Local officials and relief workers will be on the scene after a disaster, but they cannot reach everyone right away.

>  Are you prepared to administer first aid?

> Do you have sufficient food, water and clothing to survive for several days or several weeks if necessary?

> What is your Disaster Preparedness Plan? Do you even have one?

Answers to these questions and much more are outlined for you in precise detail in the Survive Anything Kit. Don’t wait until it’s too late after a disaster strikes. Disaster Issues.

 

Tornado Preparedness

Here’s what you can do to prepare for such an emergency.

Prepare a Home Tornado Plan

  • Pick a place where family members could gather if a tornado is headed your way. It could be your basement or, if there is no basement, a center hallway, bathroom, or closet on the lowest floor. Keep this place uncluttered.
  • If you are in a high-rise building, you may not have enough time to go to the lowest floor. Pick a place in a hallway in the center of the building.

Assemble a Disaster Supplies Kit Containing–First

  • Canned food and can opener
  • At least three gallons of water per person
  • Protective clothing, rainwear, and bedding or sleeping bags
  • Battery-powered radio, flashlight, and extra batteries.
  • Special items for infants, elderly, or disabled family members.
  • Written instructions for how to turn off electricity, gas and water if authorities advise you to do so. (Remember, you’ll need a professional to turn them back on.)
  • Identify where you could go if told to evacuate. Choose several places . . . a friend’s home in another town, a motel, or a shelter.

Stay Tuned For Storm Warnings:

  • Listen to your local radio and TV stations for updated storm information.
  • Know what a tornado WATCH and WARNING means:\
  • A tornado WATCH means a tornado is possible in your area.
  • A tornado WARNING means a tornado has been sighted and may be
  • headed for your area.
  • Go to safety immediately.

Tornado WATCHES and WARNINGS are issued by county or parish.

Hurricane Preparedness

Here’s what you can do to prepare for such an emergency.

Know What Hurricane Watch and Warning Means:

WATCH: Hurricane conditions are possible in the specified area of the WATCH, usually within 36 hours.

WARNING: Hurricane conditions are expected in the specified area of the WARNING, usually within 24 hours.

Prepare a Personal Evacuation Plan:

Identify ahead of time where you could go if you are told to evacuate. Choose several places–a friend’s home in another town, a motel, or a shelter.

Keep handy the telephone numbers of these places as well as a road map of your locality. You may need to take alternative or unfamiliar routes if major roads are closed or clogged.

Listen to NOAA Weather Radio or local radio or TV stations for evacuation instructions. If advised to evacuate, do so immediately.

Assemble a Disaster Supplies Kit Including the Following Items:

First aid kit and essential medications.
Canned food and can opener.

At least three gallons of water per person.
Protective clothing, rainwear, and bedding or sleeping bags.
Battery-powered radio, flashlight, and extra batteries.

Special items for infants, elderly, or disabled family members.

Prepare written instructions on how to turn off electricity, gas and water if authorities advise you to do so. (Remember, you’ll need a professional to turn them back on.)

Prepare for High Winds:

Install hurricane shutters or purchase precut 1/2 outdoor plywood boards for each window of your home. Install anchors for the plywood and pre drill holes in the plywood so that you can put it up quickly.
Make trees more wind resistant by removing diseased and damaged limbs, then strategically removing branches so that wind can blow through.

Know What to do when a Hurricane WATCH is Issued:

Listen to NOAA Weather Radio or local radio or TV stations for up-to-date storm information.

Prepare to bring inside any lawn furniture, outdoor decorations or ornaments, trash cans, hanging plants, and anything else that can be picked up by the wind.

Prepare to cover all windows of your home. If shutters have not been installed, use precut plywood as described above. Note: Tape does not prevent windows from breaking, so taping windows is not recommended.
Fill your car’s gas tank.

Recheck manufactured home tie-downs.

Check batteries and stock up on canned food, first aid supplies, drinking water, and medications.

Know What to do when a Hurricane WARNING is Issued:

Listen to the advice of local officials, and leave if they tell you to do so.
Complete preparation activities.
If you are not advised to evacuate, stay indoors, away from windows.
Be aware that the calm “eye” is deceptive; the storm is not over. The worst part of the storm will happen once the eye passes over and the winds blow from the opposite direction. Trees, shrubs, buildings, and other objects damaged by the first winds can be broken or destroyed by the second winds.

Be alert for tornadoes. Tornadoes can happen during a hurricane and after it passes over. Remain indoors, in the center of your home, in a closet or bathroom without windows.
Stay away from flood waters. If you come upon a flooded road, turn around and go another way. If you are caught on a flooded road and waters are rising rapidly around you, get out of the car and climb to higher ground.

Know What to do After a Hurricane is Over:

Keep listening to NAPA Weather Radio or local radio or TV stations for instructions.

If you evacuated, return home when local officials tell you it is safe to do so.

Inspect your home for damage.
Use flashlights in the dark; do not use candles.

We live in very uncertain times.
Will You Be Prepared?

Click Here To Get this Top-Rated E-book and more!survive anything

We live in very uncertain times.

Not only are we facing climate, environmental, and economic disasters on a global level, but individually, thousands of us experience our own forms of disaster every day.

Fires, floods, tornadoes, hurricanes, earthquakes and accidents remind us just how vulnerable we really are. What would you do if basic services–water, gas, electricity or telephones–were cut off? Local officials and relief workers will be on the scene after a disaster, but they cannot reach everyone right away.

>  Are you prepared to administer first aid?

> Do you have sufficient food, water and clothing to survive for several days or several weeks if necessary?

> What is your Disaster Preparedness Plan? Do you even have one?

Answers to these questions and much more are outlined for you in precise detail in the Survive Anything Kit. Don’t wait until it’s too late after a disaster strikes. Disaster Issues.